IWSC, in partnership with Cider Is Wine, run the first ever fermented fruit tasting


WHO WOULD HAVE BELIEVED THAT CIDERS (PERRIES & FRUIT WINES) COULD BE APPRECIATED LIKE FINE WINES?

  • IN PARTNERSHIP WITH CIDER IS WINE THE IWSC HOLDS WORLD’S FIRST 100% FERMENTED FRUIT TASTING
  • 6 LEADING INDUSTRY & CONSUMER COMMENTATORS, DECISION-MAKER JUDGES
  • 2 TROPHIES AND 35 GOLD & SILVER MEDALS AWARDED

IWSC 2021 HIGHLIGHTS

  • The IWSC collaborated with Cider Is Wine to launch the first tasting of 100% juice, not-from-concentrate ciders, perries and fruit wines.
  • The IWSC received over 100 entries from 10 countries.
  • Medal winners included 8 gold and 27 silver.
  • 2 trophies were awarded to a stand-out aged cider and an exceptional ice cider.
  • Ice cider categories took home the most gold medals, wowing the judges for their complexity and concentration of flavour.
  • The winners demonstrated ageing potential, diversity of styles and food pairing potential, all attributes of great wines.
  • Judges were made up of 6 leading industry and consumer commentators and decision makers: Fiona Beckett, award-winning food and drinks writer for The Guardian; Adam Wells, Co-editor of Cider Review and Writer & Co-editor of Graftwood; Laure Patry, Executive Head Sommelier at the Social Company; Simon Day, Production Director at Haygrove Evolution; Christine Parkinson, Co-founder of Brimful Drinks; Alistair Morrell, Co-founder of Cider Is Wine.

In partnership with Cider Is Wine  the IWSC, launched the first tasting of 100% juice, not-from-concentrate ciders, perries and fruit wines. The tasting was an opportunity to highlight the quality and diversity of this under-explored category.

The full diversity of this discovery drinks sector was on show. Entries spanned a vast range of categories, from ciders and perries made like Champagne, ice ciders, keeved ciders, pet nats and many more, with 10 countries represented at the tasting. The unexpected number of entries meant more judges were recruited to ensure the IWSC’s rigorous judging process also used for wines and spirits, was carried out to its high standard. All entries were judged blind, with the judges awarding bronze, silver and gold medals to the stand-out drinks.

Two trophies were awarded: the Cider Trophy went to Welsh producer, Llanblethian Orchards for their keeved cider, La Petite Grange du Cidre. Keeving is a practice most widely seen in the north of France, and very popular also in the West of England. With only a handful of producers in the UK championing this category, the judges were wowed by the winner’s “lemon gold colour lightly sparkling ripe apple, quince & lemon aromas, translating into the palate balanced by elegant acidity – with an earthy off to medium-dry style, lively acidity and complex layers of fruit and utterly drinkable – summer in a glass”

The Ice Cider Trophy was awarded to Swedish producer, Brännland Cider for their naturally-cold-produced ice cider, Brännland Iscider Barrique 2012. The cidery is situated 600km north of Stockholm and, incredibly, this was the producer’s first vintage; the judges were amazed by how gracefully the ice cider had aged.

Judges commented on the “wonderful golden oak colour, multi-layered to the rim, rich eastern spice & fruit – a complex style mouth-filling sweet dried fruit and apricots with fresh walnut and spiced aromas finely balanced with lip-smacking acidity, which extends to a long fruit finish. Opulent, decadent, stylish”.

The experts were pleasantly surprised by the quality of the ice ciders tasted. They were united in their admiration for what Alistair Morrell described as the “stand-out category” and the category managed to scoop the most gold medals across the board. Christine Parkinson congratulated the producers for the time spent making these “delightful” ciders. Parkinson was encouraged by the category’s “complexity and concentration of flavours; the matured examples showed careful use of ageing”. Laure Patry saw the ease with which restaurants could work with this exciting category, “the concentration and acidity on the finish were well balanced”.

Despite fruit wines being relatively new to the market, Simon Day saw “no limits to the imagination for this category”. Still ciders also caught the judges’ attention, with Parkinson noting that they “showed balance and sophistication”. The skill of the producers was evident in the quality of these ciders; with the absence of bubbles, there’s little room to hide.

With this tasting, the first of its kind, the IWSC and Cider Is Wine set out to raise awareness amongst the trade and industry of this often-misunderstood category. Co-founder of Cider Is Wine, Alistair Morrell explains that “the stunning array of flavours, tastes and styles has wowed the judges with its diversity and the potential to be appreciated as much as fine wine. The results are truly a tribute to the producers’ careful crafting, reflecting where these drinks come from, who produced them, the varietals that made them and the year in which they were harvested. In years to come this tasting will mark the beginning of what the category can achieve with consumer recognition.”

The category shows real versatility and great value for money, CEO of the IWSC, Christelle Guibert hopes “that the results from this tasting will encourage more of the industry to discover these complex and delicious drinks”.

To learn more and see the full list of the 2021 IWSC results, visit www.iwsc.net

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